DISC GOLF TRAINING

I want to help new players with developing a practice routine — so here’s lesson number one.

There are many shots in disc golf and they all require practice in order to improve on them.

Today I want to help you “get to know the discs in your bag”!

Lots of newer players to the game will typically have about 25 discs in their bag.
Try as I may, I have had a hard time convincing players to reduce the number of discs in their line up. In my opinion it is extremely difficult to really know the flight characteristics of 25 different discs and have the confidence throw every one of them with accuracy.

With that said … i suggest you start by reducing the number of discs you use for tournament play to 12-15. Chances are no one will do this. After all, you invested hundreds, maybe thousands of dollars in your discs and you feel compelled to use all of them.

So … take your big bag of discs out to a soccer or football field (that hopefully has short grass so you don’t spend your time looking for the discs) and start with a little stretching and loosening up.
If you have a partner, passing a catch disc or softer putter, back and forth, from about 50-100 feet is perfect.

Ok … your loosened up and ready to get to really know your big-bag-o-discs.
I suggest starting by throwing putters at 50% power — which should equal about 150-foot shots. Work your way to mid-ranges and then drivers for the first set of throws.

Start by trying to throw mostly straight or flat shots. Repeat the same style of throws for all of the discs in your bag, down and back or 2 reps.

On the next set of throws start imagining shots that you would use each disc for, whether that’s a turnover, hyzer, sidearm tomahawk etc.
Repeat this for at least 4 reps.
Ok, so now you have 150 or so throws in and your getting some good feedback.

Now try and see what other shots you can do with your discs that you typically do not do.
Like try hyzering your turnover discs and turnover your hyzer discs. Maybe work on throwing different heights or trajectories with your putters and mid-ranges … see what they are capable of in terms of glide and carry. Practice outside of the box.

Wind down this practice session by picking out your top 10 favorite discs — or the ones you have the most confidence. Give them 4 more reps (40 more throws), simulating the shots you would use those particular discs for during a round.

It is important that this practice session take place on a field and not on the course.

Give this routine a week or two and you will notice that by having a smaller lineup, you will reduce your errors, increase your confidence and give yourself more chances to score. In the next lesson I’ll ask if you reduced the number of discs in your starting lineup. With a manageable lineup, we can get to some more in depth training routines.

The preferred lineup for most top pros will look like this:

  • 1 putter strictly forputting (but have a backup)
  • 3 putters/approach discs – mainly for laying up and shots up to 250 feet – one for turnover, fade, and straight
  • 3 mid-ranges – ideally you would want the same rim depth and wing length – one for turnover, fade, and straight
  • The same thing goes for fairway drivers and long-winged, high speed drivers
  • The last 2 disc are specialty discs — I suggest one roller and one tomahawk
  • There is not one shot in the game that cannot be completed with these discs. To know all fifteen discs requires a lot of off-the-course training and practice.

    Having much more than fifteen discs in your starting lineup will most likely compromise your ability to have the utmost confidence with each disc.

    Comments

    1. Alex Schimm says:

      Thanks for writing these Dave. I probably check the website several days a week looking for new tips. Unfortunately my shoulder is pretty sore, so I can’t get out and do this workout.

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